About ACoSt

Announcements

Membership
To become a member

Publications

Bibliography


ACoSt Membership

Databases

Links

Coroplastic Web Sites

Forum

Archives

Contact

 

ACoSt Research



Calls for Papers
  • July 2014
  • September 2014
  • November 2014
  • February 2015
  • January 2016
  • Mars 2016
  • The deadline for submissions for this summer issue is July 1, 2014.
    • This is a final call for submissions of communications for The Association of Coroplastic Studies News and Notes.
      Communications on any aspect of research on sculptural objects made in clay from any culture or period are welcome, whether this research be in progress or already completed. Also welcome are notices of new books or dissertations on coroplastic research, as well as other bibliographic references pertaining to coroplastic studies, announcements of scholarly meetings, reports of such meetings, announcements of funding opportunities, news items involving sculptural objects made in clay, new appointments, and any other item of interest for coroplastic studies.
      • Communications can be in English, French, German, Italian, or Spanish, and should not exceed two pages in length, not including bibliography, images, and captions.
      • The bibliography and captions must be located at the end of the communication, and the images must be submitted as separate files not embedded into the text.
      • Image files should be 300 dpi, and saved as JPG, TIFF, or PNG.
    • If you are preparing a communication and cannot make the deadline please let me know. Send all submissions to me at uhlenbrj@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu. I look forward to receiving your submissions.
  • Terracottas in the Mediterranean Through Time => Abstracts of  200–300 words should be submitted by September 30, 2014

    • March 23–25, 2015, University of Haifa, Israel
      • The Zinman Institute of Archaeology and the Department of Art History of the University of Haifa, Israel, invites the submission of papers for the conference Terracottas in the Mediterranean Through Time dedicated to the study of terracotta figurines and related objects in the Mediterranean region from the early periods to late antiquity.
      • The conference is held under the auspices of the Association for Coroplastic Studies (ACoST).
        • The conference aims to bring together scholars and students who often tackle the same issues as they study clay figurines and related objects from different periods and parts of the Mediterranean region. Scholars who research terracottas of illiterate societies often use anthropological and ethnographical methods, while those studying terracottas of historical periods refer to historical sources and artistic analogies.
        • The various viewpoints and attitudes may enrich and deepen our understanding of terracotta figurines and their role in society. The scope of issues to be discussed at the conference will be wide, and will follow the different stages of the terracottas’ lives:
      • First stage -> The artisans or coroplasts: aspects of manufacture; typology and iconography; production of large and small-scale terracottas; social status of the artisans; organization of workshops; questions of specialization; relationships with other media and workshops; new technologies employed in the dating and identification of workshops.
      • Second stage -> Patterns of distribution: interaction between terracotta production and markets; local production versus imports; imitations; trading, selling and offering.
      • Third stage -> The users: Who used terracottas and who did not; how were they used and in what circumstances; usage through space and time; other objects used together with terracottas; themes and types in specific contexts (sacred, funereal and domestic); choice of types; symbolic meaning conveyed by terracottas; the role of terracottas in society; terracottas and gender.
      • Fourth stage -> Phasing out: How, why and when terracottas went out of use; patterns of deposition or obliteration; archaeological context of terracottas and its meaning.
      • Fifth stage -> Ancient terracottas today: influence of ancient terracottas on 19th- and 20th-century art; robbery and the antiquities market; museum display of terracottas.
    • The official language of the conference is English.
    • Presentations should not exceed 20 minutes.
    • Abstracts of  200–300 words should be submitted by September 30, 2014, to Dr. Adi Erlich (aerlich@research.haifa.ac.il) in Word format including surname, first name, position, affiliation, phone number, email address, and title of paper. We invite proposals for panels and individual papers on these and related topics. Looking forward to your papers,
    • The scientific committee: Dr. Adi Erlich, Dr. Sonia Klinger, Prof. Tallay Ornan.
    • Consultant: Prof. Jaimee Uhlenbrock.


  • A conference on Archéomusicology, Representation of Musicians in the Coroplastic Art of the Ancient World: Iconography, Ritual Contexts and Functions
    • March 7, 2015 – Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, New York City
  • Proposals will be evaluated by the organizing committee by November 15, 2014.
    • Sponsored by Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, European Commission Research Executive Agency, Seventh Framework Programme Marie Curie Actions, Alma Mater Studiorum, Università di Bologna, Dipartimento di Beni Culturali, campus di Ravenna
    • In collaboration with The Association for Coroplastic Studies
    • Organized by Angela Bellia and Clemente Marconi

    • Call for Papers
      Terracottas figurines with representations of musicians are a privileged field of investigation in understanding the importance of music in both its production and performative contexts. Figurines of male and female musicians are emblematic of the close link between musical practice and the sacred and ritual spheres. They contribute not only to the reconstruction of what music and the production of music meant for ancient societies, but also provide information concerning the relationship of performance to the deities, and about which musical instruments were best suited to the particulars of diverse ritual occasions, including sacred and funerary contexts.
      The analysis of terracotta figurines will take into account the presence and characteristics of different musical instruments, gestures, positions, and the clothing of both male and female musicians. The goal is to understand the status of the musicians and to interpret their musical and symbolic significance. Additionally, the terracottas will be analyzed in relation to the development of musical culture and their wider historical and social context.
      These topics will be addressed through contributions by scholars working in various fields: archaeology, art history, musicology, history of religion, and anthropology.

    • Scholars interested in any of these topics may send a proposal (for either a paper or poster) to the organizing committee. Titles and abstracts of 200-300 words in English must be sent by September 15, 2014, to Angela Bellia (angela.bellia@unibo.it).
    • The papers should not exceed 20 minutes each.
    • Applicants whose abstracts are accepted will be notified by email and asked to confirm their participation by December 15,  2014

  • Final Call for Papers: Silent Participants II, The Uses of Terracotta Figurines in Non-Official Ritual
    • Deadline for submission of abstracts: February 15, 2015 
    • 117th Annual Meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) and the Society for Classical Studies (SCS), San Francisco, CA, January 7-10, 2016
      • Sponsored by the Coroplastic Studies Interest Group (CSIG) of the Archaeological Institute of America
      • Terracotta figurines reveal a great deal of information about the lives, beliefs, and practices of the people who once handled them. Their study has undergone a revolutionary change, thanks in large measure to the great numbers discovered at well-excavated archaeological sites. Within such a frame figurines are now analyzed from different perspectives, and one of the these that has gained attention from scholars lately is a focus on the use of figurines in rituals in varied contexts: domestic, funerary, sacred, and industrial. This colloquium session aims to enhance our knowledge of terracotta figurines by exploring and discussing their use in rituals, a topic whose foundations were laid at the colloquium held at the AIA Annual Meeting in 2012 (Philadelphia, January 5-8).
      • Terracotta figurines were inexpensive items that could be used in a wide variety of rituals, both official and non-official, that is, practices that were not regulated and controlled by official institutions. Examples of such practices include, but are not limited to, those that occurred in domestic spaces, caves, graves, shrines, and even large sanctuaries, where, despite the strong presence of official control, opportunities to use figurines in non-official ritual existed. We are especially seeking papers that will deal with the use of terracotta figurines in “magical” ways and that will address methodologies on how to distinguish magic from official ritual. Abstracts on topics that cover the Mediterranean world and beyond (Greece, Rome, Egypt, Near East, Cyprus, etc.) between the pre-Bronze Age era and Late Antiquity are welcome, as are interdisciplinary approaches.
    • Abstracts should be no longer than 250 words and must follow AIA guidelines
      (http://aia.archaeological.org/pdfs/annualconference/AIA_Style_Guidelines.pdf)
    • Format: 20-minute papers and panel discussion
    • Contact Information - Erica Angliker: erica.morais.angliker@access.uzh.ch

  • Deadline: February 15, 2015
    January 7-10, 2016 – Silent participants II, The uses of Terracotta Figurines in non-official Ritual, 117th Annual Meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) and the Society for Classical Studies (SCS), San Francisco, CA
    • Sponsored by the Coroplastic Studies Interest Group Terracotta figurines reveal a great deal of information about the lives, beliefs, and practices of the people who once handled them. Their study has undergone a revolutionary change, thanks in large measure to the great numbers discovered at well-excavated archaeological sites. Within such a frame figurines are now analyzed from different perspectives, and one of the these that has gained attention from scholars lately is a focus on the use of figurines in rituals in varied contexts: domestic, funerary, sacred, and production. This colloquium session aims to enhance our knowledge of terracotta figurines by exploring and discussing their use in rituals, a topic whose foundations were laid at the colloquium held at the AIA Annual Meeting in 2012 (Philadelphia,
      January 5-8).
    • Terracotta figurines were inexpensive items that could be used in a wide variety of rituals, both official and non-official, that is, practices that were not regulated and controlled by official institutions. Examples of such practices include, but are not limited to, those that occurred in domestic spaces, caves, graves, shrines, and even large sanctuaries, where, despite the strong presence of official control, opportunities to use figurines in non-official ritual existed. We are especially seeking papers that will deal with the use of terracotta figurines in “magical” ways and that will address methodologies on how to distinguish magic from official ritual. Abstracts on topics that cover the Mediterranean world and beyond (Greece, Rome, Egypt, Near East, Cyprus, etc.) between the pre-Bronze Age era and Late Antiquity are welcome, as are interdisciplinary approaches.

      • Abstracts should be no longer than 250 words and must follow AIA guidelines
        (http://aia.archaeological.org/pdfs/annualconference/AIA_Style_Guidelines.pdf)
      • Format: 20-minute papers and panel discussion
      • Contact Information - Erica Angliker: erica.morais.angliker@access.uzh.ch
  • Call for Submissions for Les Carnets de l’ACoSt, Winter 2016 => The deadline for submissions is January 15, 2016.
    • This is a call for submissions for Les Carnets de l'ACoSt, whose second number will appear in Winter 2016. This open access journal incorporates the former ACoSt Newsletter, which will no longer be published as an independent entity, but which will be a regular feature of Les Carnets.Les Carnets will also feature longer, in-depth articles on coroplastic topics that will be subjected to anonymous peer review.
    • Communications should be no more than two pages, not including illustrations and references, while presently there is no limit on the length of submitted articles. Submissions can be in English, French, Italian, German, or Spanish.
      Les Carnets is published through revues.org, a French center for open electronic publishing.
    • Please send submissions to Oliver Pilz (opilz@uni-mainz.de). Submissions must be in a doc. or docx. format and images (.jpg) must be submitted as individual files. Please do not send a pdf, unless it is for clarification. References and bibliography follow the style guidelines of the American Journal of Archaeology.
  • This is a call for submissions for Les Carnets de l'ACoSt, whose second number will appear in Summer 2016.
    • This open access journal incorporates the former ACoSt Newsletter, which will no longer be published as an independent entity, but which will be a regular feature of Les Carnets. Les Carnets will also feature longer, in-depth articles on coroplastic topics that will be subjected to anonymous peer review. Communications section should be no more than two pages, not including illustrations and references, while presently there is no limit on the length of submitted articles. Submissions can be in English, French, Italian, German, or Spanish.
    • Les Carnets is published through revues.org, a French center for open electronic publishing.
    • The deadline for submissions is June 15, 2016.
    • Please send submissions to Oliver Pilz (opilz@uni-mainz.de). Submissions must be in a doc. or docx. format and images (.jpg) must be submitted as individual files.
    • Please do not send a pdf, unless it is for clarification.
    • References and bibliography follow the style guidelines of the American Journal of Archaeology (http://www.ajaonline.org/pdfs/AJAInstructions.pdf).


Colloquia, Symposia, Seminars…
  • 2015
  • 2016
  • September 17 – 19, 2015, Tallinn Colloquium, Ancient Near Eastern Figurines, Preliminary Program

  • June 25th-26th 2015, International colloquium Nude Female Figurines Ancient Near East, Egypt, Nubia, Mediterranean (Neolithic – 3rd century AD) Comparative and contextual studies
    • MISHA (Maison Interuniversitaire des Sciences de l’Homme d’Alsace), Salle des Conférences, Strasbourg, UMR 7044
      • With the assistance of EA 4378
      • Organizing Committee: Sylvie Donnat (UMR 7044), Régine Hunziker-Rodewald (EA 4378), Isabelle Weygand (UMR 7044).

        Theme and questions
        The ancient material cultures of the Ancient Near East, Nile area and the Mediterranean all show evidence of a particular type of figurine made in an open mould or modelled by hand: the nude (or semi-nude) female figurine with emphasis on sexual attributes. These artefacts are made in several materials, most frequently in terracotta, but also in faience, wood, stone, etc. Various names have been attributed to them: for example, “nude female figurines”, “fertility figurines”, or “Astarte plaques”. Their analysis raises several questions at different levels. Locally, issues concerning production, use, function, archaeological contexts, associated material, and symbolic aspects of a specific corpus may be considered. In historical and regional terms the common presence of this type of artefact across a significant geographical area and over a considerable historical period (the Neolithic period to the beginning of our era) is striking.
        This material, already studied in the past, should be reconsidered within a cross-disciplinary approach, updated by new or unpublished data. This collective project should consider the production of nude female figurines, not only regarding their similarities, but also the specificities of each corpus. The study should include complementary approaches:  archaeological studies of material data, historical research into cultural interactions and dynamics of cultural changes, discussions from Gender Studies concerning the users’ identity and perspectives from Anthropology of Religion on the possible symbolic behaviours involving these objects.

        Conduct of research
        Since December 2012, the TEO (“Territoires et Empires d’Orient”, UMR 7044-Archimède) research team has organised seminars at the University of Strasbourg. The aim is to investigate nude female figurines within a large area: the Ancient Near-East, Egypt, Nubia and the Mediterranean. To complete this preliminary work, an international colloquium will be held in Strasbourg, June 25th-26th 2015. The project encompasses two branches of research; the first will analyse the corpora of figurines within their archaeological, technical and cultural context, the second will study these specific figurines using a cross-disciplinary and comparative approach.
        Both approaches will have to take into consideration the technical, historical, semantic, and religious aspects as well as the contexts of each discovery. The colloquium will end with an open discussion to allow participants to exchange and share their views on the uses of nude female figurines and on the extensive presence of this kind of object in this large, specific area.
        To complement and illustrate the discussions of the colloquium, an exhibition will be organized: it will include nude female figurines and other ancient figurines from the collection of the Institute of Egyptology (University of Strasbourg), images of figurines from Mari, and a virtual exhibition of Egyptian figurines and Jordanian female figurines from the Iron Age. It will open on June 24th 2015, in MISHA.

        Approaches
        In keeping with the theme of the colloquium, presentations will focus on two comprehensive approaches.

        –  Approach 1. “Figurines in context. Archaeological and socio-cultural aspects”
        The contributors will refer to a specific corpus (published or not yet published) from one of the areas studied in the colloquium (Nile area, the Ancient Near East, the Mediterranean). Careful attention will be given to precise archaeological contexts of findings. The purpose is to understand the artefacts considered within their social and cultural context. Several points will be considered: production and workshops, material characteristics (clay, technique, colours), symbolic values, ritual and votive functions

        – Approach 2.Interpreting nude female figurines A comparative study using several assemblages from one or several cultural groups will be presented. Many questions arise, such as the iconography of the naked female figure on various materials over a long chronological sequence, the techniques of modelling or moulding used, local workshops, the contribution of the textual sources, the ritual and symbolic values of the figurines. What are the relationships between groups of artefacts? Did groups influence one another, either technically or culturally?

        All speakers are invited. The program of the conference will be published in due time. Contact: Sylvie Donnat (sylvie.donnat@misha.fr); Régine Hunziker-Rodewald (rhunziker@unistra.fr); Isabelle Weygand (i.weygand@laposte.net).

  • A one-day colloquium "Simbolo e gesto: La determinazione di genere nelle statuette fittili del mondo greco" will be held at the Univerisity of Genoa on Tuesday, April 5, 2016. This event will take place in the Aula Magna of the School of Humanistic Sciences, via Balbi 2. Attached is a pdf of the announcement for your examination.


In Focus
  • Au musée de l'archéologie, on peut adopter des figurines !
    Le Paris, Patrick Caffin (17 Janv. 2015, Vendeuil-Capl)y.
    • Adrien Bossard, directeur du musée, présente une des figurines « adoptables ». L’argent récolté servira notamment à financer leur restauration.
      Devenir le parrain d'une figurine gallo-romaine pour avoir son nom sur le cartel d'explication lors des expositions de « votre » figurine et assister aux diverses étapes de sa restauration. C'est le principe proposé par Adrien Bossard, directeur du musée archéologique de Vendeuil-Caply.
      Quasiment en sommeil depuis son ouverture, en 2011, le musée va changer de dimension cette année. Depuis son arrivée, en juillet 2013, le directeur s'est lancé dans une grande opération de dépoussiérage. Au menu, une exposition ( voir par ailleurs), un dossier de dix pages dans le prochain numéro de la revue Archéologia et un parrainage innovant pour récolter des fonds afin de restaurer des figurines gallo-romaines.
      Une de ses premières décisions a été de sortir 80 des 200 figurines de la réserve où elles étaient stockées depuis juillet 2013. « C'est vrai que j'aurais pu choisir de les laisser accessibles aux seuls chercheurs, mais il fallait les montrer au public le plus rapidement possible », déclare-t-il. En effet, ces fameuses figurines se sont révélées être une découverte archéologique majeure.
      « Ce sont des figurines en terre cuite gallo-romaine datant du IIe siècle après Jésus-Christ, explique-t-il. Elles sont exceptionnelles car elles sont polychromes. Jusqu'à cette découverte, toutes les figurines de cette époque étaient blanches. Là, les archéologues ont trouvé des animaux en couleur. En fait, nous avons découvert qu'il y avait eu un grand incendie entre 170 et 180 après Jésus-Christ. Les figurines ont dû être recuites à cette occasion, ce qui a fixé les pigments de couleur ».
      Ce sont ces figurines qui sont proposées à « l'adoption ». « L'idée m'est venue d'une opération similaire réalisée à Versailles, précise Adrien Bossard. Une souscription publique a été lancée pour restaurer les bancs du parc du château et il était proposé aux donateurs d'adopter un banc. Une figurine, c'est plus poétique quand même. Pour parrainer, le tarif est de 100 € par figurine. Cette somme est déductible à 66 % des impôts. Une trentaine de figurines sont encore disponibles à l'adoption. »
      L'argent récolté servira à financer les analyses et la restauration des figurines. « Ce sont des restaurateurs spécialisés qui réaliseront l'opération en collaboration avec le centre de recherche des musées de France, précise Adrien Bossard. S'il reste des fonds, il servira à poursuivre les recherches autour du théâtre gallo-romain de Caply. Il faut savoir que sur notre parcelle de 100 ha, seule un quart a été fouillé. Nous aurons bientôt de nouvelles belles découvertes ».
Exhibitions

  • June 24th to July 8th 2015, Nude Female Figurines and Other Ancient Figurines
    • Associated Exhibition with International colloquium, MISHA, salle Europe
    • Exhibition commissioners: Frédéric Colin (UMR 7044), Sylvie Donnat (UMR 7044) Régine Hunziker-Rodewald (EA 4378), Isabelle Weygand (UMR 7044)
Newscast
  • Emergency Red List of Syrian Cultural Objects at Risk
    • Following reports of widespread damage and looting at cultural heritage sites in Syria, ICOM decided to publish the Emergency Red List of Syrian Cultural Objects at Risk with the aim to help art and heritage professionals and law enforcement officials identify Syrian objects that are protected by national and international legislations. In order to facilitate identification, the Emergency Red List illustrates the categories or types of cultural items that are most likely to be illegally bought and sold.

 




ACoSt Research
ACoSt Membership